Ward Eleven is an idyllic conglomeration of primarily residential neighborhoods with excellent access to parks and recreation including the Minnehaha Creek parkway and Lake Nokomis and Diamond Lake.

Ward Eleven is located in the south central part of Minneapolis and includes nine neighborhoods: Tangletown, Field, Page, Hale, Northrop, Diamond Lake, Wenonah, Windom, and Keewaydin.

Erica Mauter

Why are you running for office?

I believe Minneapolis has to be affordable and accessible for every resident, and should be a sanctuary in every sense of the word. I thought about what I wanted to see in the council member who represents me and realized that I had to step up and be that change. I’m running to drive a real conversation in Ward 11 about what we want for our city. I’m running to create space for others who are motivated by the current political climate to get involved and make a difference.

Tell Us About Yourself

Pronouns: She/her/hers
Party Affiliation: DFL
Do you own or rent your home? Own

 

Let’s Get To Know You

What is your favorite album?

Rhythm Nation 1814

 

Who are your heroes?

Peggy Flanagan and Ilhan Omar bring their full selves and identities to their roles as legislators.

 

How do you plan to engage with and be held accountable by community once you are elected?

I’m running to be a good partner inside city government to people and organizations working outside it. I’ve sought support from people and organizations whose values I believe in, because I value the way they work. I’m relying on them to support me and hold me accountable. I engage with community now by asking for help and listening to others. As council member I’ll connect residents to information, advocacy opportunities, and resources, and I’ll center marginalized voices in those spaces.

 

What’s your favorite thing about Minneapolis?

Parks, people, and the fringe festival. It has everything I wanted in a bigger city, and it’s all more accessible.

 

The Issues

Why should young people be invested in local politics?

Local government has so much impact on our daily lives, in ways we don’t even notice.

 

Where do the inequities in our city stem from?

The inequities in our city stem from white supremacy and how that has been enshrined in our policies as structural racism. Our city, like the rest of our country, was built on stolen land with stolen labor, and until we make specific redress for these historical facts, inequities will persist.

 

What single issue could have the biggest impact in closing racial disparities in our city?

There’s not just one. Unless we’re talking Universal Basic Income, reparations, or some other infusion of wealth for our poorest residents.

 

Do you believe that we could ever have a city without police?

No

 

What would you do, as an elected official, to bring us closer to police abolition?

We must reimagine public safety. That should be grounded in the historical context that modern policing evolved from slave patrols. We need to allow communities to identify for themselves what public safety looks like, and empower them to enact that. Both history and current events tell me that having more police around might actually make me as a POC less safe, rather than more safe. I will work to implement a safety beyond policing framework that adds non-police resources to our 911 response.

 

How do we continue to grow our city without displacing the people that want to stay here?

Access to safe and healthy housing is critical. We need to invest in housing broadly, adopt an inclusionary zoning policy that ensures that we are building affordable housing as we grow, preserve naturally occurring affordable housing, strengthen renters’ rights so that renters aren’t displaced or kept in substandard housing by predatory landlords, fund necessary capital improvements in public housing, change zoning so that we make space for more people in all neighborhoods, and structurally include renters’ voices in key decision-making processes. Community engagement should inform every development opportunity; a proactive council member can influence this.

 

How will you fight against state preemption of local control?

Cities are the last line of defense. I will work with our partners at the state legislature to advocate for our interests and help organize residents to do the same. I will be responsive to preemption efforts with contingencies for existing ordinances that are being targeted.

 

What policy changes are necessary to improve the health of all Minneapolis residents?

We need to invest in housing inspectors that will adequately enforce health codes. We need to address the history of environmental racism in our city; the Green Zones initiative is an excellent tool to begin this work. A robust local food system is needed to ensure all residents have access to fresh and healthy food. We need to abide by our Complete Streets policy and advocate for a transit system that makes it easier for people to walk, bike, and use transit instead of driving in cars.

 

How can the city improve our transportation infrastructure?

We must continue to implement our Complete Streets policy and our pedestrian and bicycle master plans. This infrastructure not only protects pedestrians and cyclists as they move, it calms traffic and makes it safer for all users of our streets. For similar safety reasons, we should continue to make capital investments in traffic management. Lastly, we must advocate with state, local, and regional partners for train and bus routes that serve the needs of people who live and work in Minneapolis.

 

How will you work to improve conditions for workers in our city?

I’ll advocate for adoption of a fair scheduling ordinance and ending wage theft. We must be vigilant as we implement the $15 minimum wage. I look forward to prioritizing people of color for green jobs through the Green Zones initiative. We must commit to community wealth building for people of color and indigenous communities. I will support developing cooperative ownership of land, businesses, and property. I look forward to partnering with labor unions on this work.

 

How do you define sanctuary city? Do you believe that Minneapolis should fill this role and what would you do to make this happen?

I believe Minneapolis must be a sanctuary in every sense of the word. Every resident should have access to safe and healthy housing, food, and healthcare. Every resident should be able to go about their lives feeling safe in their community. I’ll advocate for municipal ID’s for participation in local government and services, enforcement and strengthening of our separation ordinance, and the other components of MIRAC’s Minneapolis Sanctuary Platform.

 

What is the role of city government in shaping Minneapolis as the city of the future?

City government exists to do for us collectively what we can’t do for ourselves individually. City government has a huge impact on our daily lives, and I strongly believe in city government as a force for good. Further, city government helped create the disparities that we have, and so city government has to play a role in eliminating them. I believe that centering the voices of our most marginalized and vulnerable residents will truly transform our city.

 

Anything else you want people to know? 
You may not be certain that electing one queer woman of color to the Minneapolis city council will make significant change. However, given our decades-long history of persistent equity gaps, you can be certain that continuing to elect a council majority of straight white men will NOT result in significant change. Voters across the city have the opportunity to make a transformative choice, to elect a city council that reflects our changing demographics, and represents the future of our city.

 

For more information, visit www.ericamauter.org.

Jeremy Schroeder

Why are you running for office?

I’m passionate about the power of government to be a force for good. When our elected officials work with community members, City Hall can be a powerful place to get things done. City government connects intimately with people’s everyday lives, and offers an opportunity to demonstrate that a better city — if not a better world — is possible. Serving on the City Council is more than a job. I’m running to champion progressive policies that strengthen our democracy from the inside. 

Tell Us About Yourself

Pronouns: He/him/his
Party Affiliation: DFL
Do you own or rent your home? Own

 

Let’s Get To Know You

What is your favorite album?

It Takes a Nation of Millions To Hold Us Back by Public Enemy

 

Who are your heroes?

Bryan Stevenson. He’s a dedicated, smart problem solver who fights to end the death penalty.

 

How do you plan to engage with and be held accountable by community once you are elected?

My campaign reflects the culture of inclusivity and accessibility I intend to bring to City Hall. Focusing on one-on-one conversations and putting the community first is the foundation for meaningful policy solutions. Since January I have had dozens of meet-and-greets, held weekly coffees where everyone is welcome to share their ideas, knocked doors and called neighbors — constant community engagement is a habit I will not break after the election.

 

What’s your favorite thing about Minneapolis?

The people who make our communities vibrant and strong, our commitment to progressive ideals, and also our bike trails and the river.

 

The Issues

Why should young people be invested in local politics?

Young people are our future, and should feel empowered to shape the world they want to live in and lead. Politics is the launchpad for that.

 

Where do the inequities in our city stem from?

Inequities stem from people not having their basic human needs met and further, from our society simply not recognizing the basic needs of many — a critical piece of a thriving community.  Today, the fundamental rights to housing, a decent job, fair wages, being heard, and to believe and be oneself are too often overlooked and unrecognized. We need to change this. Systemic racism is also a factor that needs to be considered with in every aspect of our policy making.

 

What single issue could have the biggest impact in closing racial disparities in our city?

Safe, affordable and stable housing is a proven contributor to better health and education outcomes, especially for children.

 

Do you believe that we could ever have a city without police?

Yes

 

What would you do, as an elected official, to bring us closer to police abolition?

The community must be the top priority in all policymaking, and particularly when it comes to policing. We are at a pivotal crossroads, and I pledge to stand on the side of the people — especially long-marginalized groups — to chart a better path for our future. The current police system is built around a culture of prejudice, violence, and intolerance. None of this is acceptable, and I will not stand for it. I will demand a better, more peaceful, and fairer future that puts the people first.

 

How do we continue to grow our city without displacing the people that want to stay here?

Minneapolis needs real fixes that expand affordable housing development and preservation while promoting a healthier housing economy. I will fight to deepen reserves available in the Affordable Housing Trust fund, a critical pool that enables new affordable units. I will increase funding for efforts to preserve our vulnerable existing affordable rentals, and resources to support renters’ rights. I will push to modernize zoning rules to allow more housing density, particularly in neighborhood interiors dominated by single-family homes. In Ward 11, this will especially benefit our growing senior population. These policies are easier to implement when Minneapolis has a thriving housing market with housing options along the income continuum.

 

How will you fight against state preemption of local control?

I will fight fiercely against any threats to Minneapolis’ ability to lead on important issues, including workers’ rights and sustainability. I’ve spent my career shaping policy, including at the State Capitol. I understand how this maneuvering works. It’s critical that our city loudly and proudly affirm its progressive leadership, and resist harmful policies enacted at the state and federal levels. This work demands vigilance. I stand ready to defend our city against misguided policy plays.

 

What policy changes are necessary to improve the health of all Minneapolis residents?

We deserve a city that helps everyone live extraordinary lives. We need forward-thinking leaders who understand that everyone in the community must be at the table. We need leaders focused on systemic change to make City Hall more transparent, accessible, & accountable. As the ED of Common Cause MN, I helped  launch early voting & fought for restoring voting rights for ex-felons. I believe in the power of the people, & Minneapolis’ potential to serve them well with the right leadership in place.

 

How can the city improve our transportation infrastructure?

I believe in a data-driven approach, informed by community input, to building out transportation infrastructure that prioritizes pedestrians, cyclists, and transit. These modes promote health and encourage more equitable access to our city. Anyone, young or old or in between, should be able to safely walk or bike throughout Minneapolis. City leaders must advocate for transit access, upgrades, and funding. Relying on transit should be efficient, affordable, and reliable.

 

How will you work to improve conditions for workers in our city?

As legislative director for SEIU Local 880 in Chicago, I fought for — and won — wage and benefit increases for working families. Our success was possible because workers shared their stories about the injustices they faced. At City Hill, I intend to continue to amplify those voices. City Hall needs to protect workers’ right to unionize. I will have regular check-ins with labor, and involve unions in policymaking. Everyone benefits when workers are treated fairly and paid a living wage.

 

How do you define sanctuary city? Do you believe that Minneapolis should fill this role and what would you do to make this happen?

A sanctuary city shields its residents from traumas they face. Minneapolis needs to stand up to definitively protect everyone within its borders. We should refuse to cooperate with problematic federal agencies like ICE, and push against those who do. We should be a leader in multi-city coalitions to safeguard our funding and stand up firmly against Trump’s hateful policy. It is essential that we be loud and unequivocal in our message: everyone has rights here and we will fight for them.

 

What is the role of city government in shaping Minneapolis as the city of the future?

City government not only enacts policies, but facilitates the discussion of what our city should become. As we pay the costs of climate inaction and ignoring racial justice, we need to imagine a better future where we support and grow sustainable, equitable communities through visionary policy. Leaders need to listen to community groups and local businesses — especially those who don’t already know their way around City Hall — and must engage with those still on the sidelines of our system.

 

Anything else you want people to know? 
I’m the candidate that has worked in advocacy my entire career. I have dedicated my life to serving in my communities because I truly believe that building successful and inclusive coalitions is vital to our community’s future. We can only move forward together.

 

For more information, visit www.jeremyschroeder.org.

John Quincy, Incumbent

Did not respond.

John Quincy is the incumbent running for the office of City Council for Ward 11. For more information, visit www.johnmquincy.org.

This is our city. We’re fighting to make it better for all of us.

 

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