Fireside Chat: Racism In Minnesota: How We Got Here
Hennepin History Museum

01/13/2019

Dr. William (Bill) Green will discuss Minnesota’s reputation regarding race relations. By the end of the 19th century, we had become a state recognized by the national civil rights community for its enlightened policies on black political and social equality. This was the perception that policy makers and boosters of the state (including African American leaders) promoted, particularly during a time in the nation’s history when African Americans in the South, and increasingly in the North, suffered unbridled racial violence. But as Minnesota entered the 20th century, black residents found that they continued to be subjected to discrimination and worse, despite the laws and their access to the state’s power elite. Bill will explore how this happened and why, in terms of race relations, those who governed and those who were governed existed in fundamentally parallel worlds.

Dr. Green is a Professor of History at Augsburg University, Minneapolis. He has thought deeply- and written extensively about race relations and civil rights. He holds PhD and JD degrees, which add to the perspective he brings to these subjects. Author of three books and numerous articles and op ed pieces, Bill will be back in March to talk about Nellie Francis, a leader in Minnesota’s suffrage movement and more black women in Minnesota’s history. Dr. William (Bill) Green will discuss Minnesota’s reputation regarding race relations. By the end of the 19th century, we had become a state recognized by the national civil rights community for its enlightened policies on black political and social equality. This was the perception that policy makers and boosters of the state (including African American leaders) promoted, particularly during a time in the nation’s history when African Americans in the South, and increasingly in the North, suffered unbridled racial violence. But as Minnesota entered the 20th century, black residents found that they continued to be subjected to discrimination and worse, despite the laws and their access to the state’s power elite. Bill will explore how this happened and why, in terms of race relations, those who governed and those who were governed existed in fundamentally parallel worlds.

Dr. Green is a Professor of History at Augsburg University, Minneapolis. He has thought deeply- and written extensively about race relations and civil rights. He holds PhD and JD degrees, which add to the perspective he brings to these subjects. Author of three books and numerous articles and op ed pieces, Bill will be back in March to talk about Nellie Francis, a leader in Minnesota’s suffrage movement and other black women in Minnesota’s history.

Tickets available: $5; $3 for seniors and students; free for Museum members.

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